Gold Vision Watercolor, paper, and gold thread.  August 2017.

Gold Vision

Watercolor, paper, and gold thread.  August 2017.

Visual cues to be understood by the primary visual cortex.  

Primary Drip Watercolor on Paper.  September 2017.

Primary Drip

Watercolor on Paper.  September 2017.

Primary 2 Watercolor on Paper.  September 2017.

Primary 2

Watercolor on Paper.  September 2017.

Primary 1 Watercolor on Paper.  September 2017.

Primary 1

Watercolor on Paper.  September 2017.


Explorations in Braille, abstract Braille, and the temporality of memory.

Time Flies Watercolor on Paper.  August 2017.

Time Flies

Watercolor on Paper.  August 2017.

Passage Watercolor on Paper.  September 2017.

Passage

Watercolor on Paper.  September 2017.

Blurred Watercolor on Paper.  September 2017.

Blurred

Watercolor on Paper.  September 2017.

Brain + Mind Oil on Wood Panel.  October 2017.

Brain + Mind

Oil on Wood Panel.  October 2017.

Photon Energy Blue Oil on Wood Panel.  September 2017.

Photon Energy Blue

Oil on Wood Panel.  September 2017.

Photon Energy Green Oil on Wood Panel.  October 2017.

Photon Energy Green

Oil on Wood Panel.  October 2017.

Before and After Oil on Wood Panel.  September 2017.

Before and After

Oil on Wood Panel.  September 2017.


The Things They Carry

Duet show at the Yadawei Gallery & Studio in Dubai, U.A.E. with artist Debjani Bhardwaj - March 8-30

The Things They Carry

Facets

Facets serves to remind us we are all human - no matter where we come from.

Our families, friends, and communities weave within and around us and become a part of what we carry with us for the rest of our lives. These social connections are a fundamental necessity for all humans and become a part of our identity. Their influence is colorful and echoes back to us in repetitive patterns. The woven echoes we carry with us also hold our facets, or character together. Everyone's facets are different; some have only begun to take shape, whereas others have become complete in their form.

 

Just as every human has their own facets, every human being on Earth has over 100 billion neurons within their brain. These neurons are often rendered in color through neuroimaging by functional magnetic resonance images. The colors show how the neurons interact with each other when engaged. Bright or bold colors show strong connections and subtler colors show weaker connections - these connections represent our feelings.

We are resilient creatures.

We carry our own identities.

We carry our communities.

And we carry each other.


Clay as Textile

Solo show at The Chicago Weaving School in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. - February 17 - March 30

Clay as Textile

Textiles give volume and texture.  

In clay as textile, I handled the clay as if it were a piece of fabric.  Keeping in mind the pliable nature of textiles, and often working with extrusions that are very wet or more dry to achieve the texture and feel I was looking for.  Aspects I kept in mind while working with the clay, included wrapping, knitting, stitching through, and weaving.  Occasionally, I would decide to finish works with actual textiles and creating pieces that merge the clay with fiber.

This exploration of familiarities between clay and fiber is an ongoing passion that drives my making.


MA Fine Art Show  at The Civic - Barnsley, United Kingdom - June 15 - 28, 2016

Mind’s Eye

There is a marvellous place between science and art; this is where I choose to work.  

Currently, I am exploring altered human vision and its impact on our visual cognition.   My works in Mind's Eye, presented with rewoven weavings and clay sculptures, demonstrate our brain’s ability to fill in visual vacancies.  I delight in my ability to reinterpret research and life experience into works of art.  I imagine what vision would be like with an artificial retina and use it as the basis for my making.

My practice is interdisciplinary with an emphasis on weaving, ceramics, and photography. My woven work combines ideas about pattern, texture, and materials in a necessarily systematic and organized way. In contrast to the structure of weaving, I also love the fluidity and unpredictability of clay, and my sculptural work plays on these qualities though clean, simple shapes. My photographs use analog techniques to mirror the experience of altered vision.   

I find inspiration from reading about science, reflecting on personal experience with the fragility of visual cognition, and embracing a genuine curiosity for the world around me. My previous works have included kinetic microcomputer sculptures, abstract interpretations of ocular laser imagery, and explorations into the future of vision with weavings based on artificial retina research.

I seek to reflect an extraordinary world through everyday material.


Untitled Electric Two 2014 Plain woven monofilament, LED board, micro controller, and other electronic components.

Untitled Electric Two 2014

Plain woven monofilament, LED board, micro controller, and other electronic components.

Untitled Electric One 2014 Plain woven monofilament, micro controller, robotic parts, and acrylic.

Untitled Electric One 2014

Plain woven monofilament, micro controller, robotic parts, and acrylic.

Sea Creature Brooch Hand cast white bronze and gold leaf.

Sea Creature Brooch

Hand cast white bronze and gold leaf.

Flow Wood, paper, steel, and silk crepe.

Flow

Wood, paper, steel, and silk crepe.